New Street Photography Workshops: London and Berlin

New Street Photography Workshops: London and Berlin

London and Berlin – what amazing cities to do street photography, meet passionate people and learn how to see and craft stunning images! I am very excited to invite you to the three-day workshops I have the privilege to lead.

There is no question that there is a plethora of street photography out there – and some truly brilliant work. However, photographing in the city is so much more than the word “street” implies. Although most street photography deals with documenting what’s out there and in plain sight, we want to go beyond that. Our objective is to create imagery which not only challenges your senses but triggers an emotional and visual reaction – whatever it may be. Yes, you are right! Sometimes such work is not easy to consume but one thing is for sure – it will give the viewer pause, trigger emotions and jolt the thought process. To achieve this, we have worked over the course of the last few years to create a program which helps you to do just that.

During these three days, we will discover our inner seeing and challenge ourselves to be different but bold. There will also be some discussions, presentations and technicalities. My objective in the three-day workshops is not to show you how to photograph on the street but teach you methods, provide you with tools and empower you to capture visuals in your own unique way. Ultimately your personality, your life experiences and your inner strengths will guide the seeing.

There are very limited spots available in order to allow the maximum personal interaction, so please book early (see links below).

The Streets of London / March 9 – 11, 2018 

The Streets of Berlin / March 16 – 18, 2018 

Blowing my own horn is not something I like to do so let’s hear what others have to say about yours truly.

“A true visual poet” – Sid, podcaster

Olaf posesses that rare ability to truly observe that which the rest of us can only see – Spencer Wynn, Fujifilm X-Photographer

“I’ve seen Olaf at work, and it is poetry” – Peter Faris, workshop participant

“Real Artistic Visionary” – Tomash, a founder of FujiLove

 “One of the best street photographers out there” – Mac Sokulski, photographer and podcaster 

“Olaf’s stunning photography is a visual gift to the world” – Patrick, a founder of Fujirumors.com 

“A unique eye for superbly creative and aesthetically pleasing images” –  Iain Palmer, a founder of 53mm

“Olaf’s photos always surprise with their dramatic contrasts, reduction of elements to powerful geometric shapes and the placement of colour where it matters. All this, despite his wicked sense of humour.”Sally Jennings, a writer and editor

Here are examples of the sort of images we will be crafting:

If you would like to see more of my imagery please visit www.olafphoto.com

Just a sample what workshop participants think about the experience:

 I was extremely resistant to both (street and photography) because it meant I had to ask people for photographs or bypass their permission. Olaf’s teaching let me put the worst of that behind me, even (amazing!) made me enjoy it. The result? The best five days of my photographic life and some of the best images I’ve ever produced. I’ll never be the photographer he is but he shared enough of his knowledge and focus that I came out of the workshop a much better photographer than the guy that went in. – Robert Raisler, California

“Having just completed a workshop with Olaf I can honestly say my photography will never be the same. Much better I am sure. I was new to street photography and I appreciated Olaf’s style of explaining about, then demonstrating all that went into setting up and taking the shot, then showing us the result. That gave me the confidence to venture out on my own for some great people and town shots. His feedback on my shots was extremely helpful.” – Elaine, California

“The video and blog only gave a taste of what it was like to work with Olaf in person. He has a singular devotion to his work, and has acquired expert knowledge of how to capture amazing images. Fortunately, he is incredibly generous in sharing this knowledge. Without knowing Olaf, my biggest fear in taking the workshop (apart from the fear my images might suck) was that he might be a secretive hard-case who dribbled out crumbs of information. The exact opposite was true. Shooting sessions included solid approaches to getting good images, but were also filled with many creative suggestions. I have many more great images from the workshop, and many great memories as well. I highly recommend his workshop to aspiring photographers, and also to experienced photographers seeking inspiration and a unique perspective.” – Peter Faris, Calgary 

 “I want to thank you again for your work as teacher. At the end of first shooting session I was desperate, almost to tears. I felt that I was ridiculously wasting the time of a great photographer in an attempt to learn things that I would never be able to do, even to see. “But we went on, and your presence, the way you shot began to inspire me. Finally, I couldn’t believe I got it. With your vision and work I began to connect with my work. The images I previewed were there, even in ways I had not expected. Yes, I had been able to truly express myself photographically. “I began seeing. Thank you again, Olaf.” – Robert Mañé Velilla, Barcelona

  

 

 

2017 © Olafphoto. All rights reserved.

 

 

 

Encounter #1

Encounter #1

On the road, one of our favourite activities is to photograph historical and, ideally, remote places. Many of these places are called ghost towns because they are now just a ghost of the once bustling frontier town. Most of them are visually appealing and photographing them shouldn’t pose a challenge. Remote locations, interesting wooden structures, rusty old machinery and cobwebby interiors provide plenty of material for a photographer. We’ve done our share of this kind of photography.

There is another, much less visible dimension to these places. How do you capture the mood of the place, especially one that doesn’t breathe anymore? How do you point your camera to a silent scene so that you capture stories of love, compassion and bravery but also extreme violence and death?

Those fleeting moments and visual encounters may be just in my head but I like to use light, line and my imagination to express my emotions and witness an encounter with the past. Can I hear voices on the wind?

Molson, Washington. Captured with the X-Pro2 paired with the XF 50-140mm F2.8 and the XF 14mm F2.8. Acros (A) and Classic Chrome (CC) film simulations.

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The Encounter. To be continued…

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Did you like the imagery? Subscribe to Simplicity-In-Seeing and learn what is really important in photography! 

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2017 © Olafphoto. All rights reserved.

Parallel Seeing

Parallel Seeing

The leaves have already started falling. The summer display of fake smiles, exaggerated colours and sunburned thoughts is fading away. A much more subdued, desolate and harsh time is coming.

I have always liked this time of the year. This is when my seeing comes alive and I don’t really know why. Maybe I like the cooler misty mornings, which put a grey tarp over all visual rubbish that surrounds us. Maybe it is the change in the rhythm of our daily lives or a return of realism hijacked by the masquerade of summer affairs. Or it may well be just that my personal seeing clock strikes twelve.

Whatever it is, the summer days when my camera and I shared silent days are long gone. My list of projects has grown in every direction at frightening speed. I am not complaining, not at all. Somehow this burst of ideas and energy prompted by my Muse works for me.

There are two distinct but parallel routes.

One route is the cyclical flare-up of seeing and creating. You never know where it will take you. I learnt the hard way not to resist this force, to allow it to steer me all over the place. There will be a lot of “whys” but I know that answers will eventually come at the right time.

Then there is the official route. Professional projects, which must be taken care of and taken right on. Somehow, I enjoy this route as much as the other one. This year especially a major new mega project is approaching its premiere (stay tuned for details).

In the meantime, I would like to share with you some recent images. Some of them have already found their home and they will be part of some exciting projects. Others are the fruit of the aforementioned burst in seeing. They came to life from wandering around. Don’t ask me for details – they’ll come later.

All imagery shot with the Fujifilm X-Pro2 paired with the XF 35mm F1.4 and the XF 14mm F2.8. Classic Chrome (CC) and ACROS (A) film simulations.

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and some in colour…

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2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.

The Sister I Didn’t Know I Had (Part 2)

The Sister I Didn’t Know I Had (Part 2)

Ten years ago I received a lifesaving kidney transplant from Madeleine. The gift of these ten healthy years meant I could travel, take photographs and share my writing with you. Without Madeleine and her generosity there would be no olafphotoblog.

During these years, I have spent a lot of time thinking why this woman found so much courage to save one man’s life. Where did her strength come from? What triggered this decision? Why was I so fortunate?

Kasia and I always knew we wanted to meet Madeleine’s family to get to know her history and visit her place of birth. This year, we did just that. 

Please make sure you read the first part of this series here.

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Madeleine took me to her classroom, now a museum. She sat down in her chair and put her hands on the desk. I just had to take this image. People’s hands tell so much.

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We visited a few more rooms, each one revealing more stories about the town of St. Pierre Jolys and its people.

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A rosary caught my attention. Who did it belong to? Was it prayed on?

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Then I ventured into one of the rooms and found dusty old Brownie camera, sitting on a top shelf.

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For some strange reason, I started to ponder about my road to seeing.

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The last ten years have been especially rewarding, as this gift of life allowed me to take a new path. Seeing has become my way of communication in this world. I found that doubt, struggle and vulnerability pave the way to creativity and self-discovery. How telling! Who knew that the old Kodak Brownie on a dusty shelf could spark such musing?!

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In fact, I have to give credit to Madeleine who has been pushing me toward the world of seeing. Both Kasia and Madeleine have been my motivators and judges.

Once we left the museum, we decided to visit the grave of Madeleine’s grandfather. It is one of a few places where the ashes of Madeleine’s father, Rene Mulaire, were scattered.

Cecile and Madeleine walked in silence.

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We all could feel the presence of Madeleine’s grandfather and father. What incredible men! Who knew that their grand/daughter would be standing here with a stranger whose life she had saved.

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The same day, Madeleine’s family organized a lovely dinner for Kasia and me. We could both feel the warmth and genuine kindness all around us.

The following day we started our drive home. Over the course of the long drive we thought about Madeleine and her family. The beauty of the Glacier National Park provided a great visual background for our contemplation.

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I realized once again that without Madeleine I wouldn’t be here to feel, connect and see. Strangely enough, the dramatic visuals only underlined this belief. I took out my camera and started seeing. It was my thank you and it always will be.

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If you have enjoyed this personal series, I have a favour to ask of you. There are thousands of people waiting for an organ transplant in North America. In the meantime, most people die each year taking their organs with them.

Could you please find a few minutes today to make the decision? Consider becoming an organ donor after your death. Please let others know your decision and register at BC’s Organ Donor Registry https://register.transplant.bc.ca. In the United States http://www.organdonor.gov.

You can find similar programs in your country.

Think about it. You can save as many as eight lives just by signing on. No effort is required. And if you’re lucky you can help your new friend take photos after your death (:

Still not convinced? Then watch this.

 

All images taken with the Fujifilm X100S, Fujifilm X-Pro2, the XF 35mm F1.4, XF 14mm F2.8, XF 50-140mm F2.8.

 

2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.

The Sister I Didn’t Know I Had (Part 1)

The Sister I Didn’t Know I Had (Part 1)

Ten years ago I was yet again a dying man. Regular dialysis kept me alive but drained my body of precious energy so I paid almost weekly visits to the Emergency department. I felt tired, depressed and very sick.

This physical and emotional end-of-the-road exhaustion came exactly three years after my multi-month stay in an intensive care unit. That was when I was dying the first time.

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It all started one ordinary Sunday afternoon when I was playing soccer with my friends. During the game I suffered a small scratch on my leg – one that you would probably ignore. So did I!

However, within hours I started to feel unusually weak. That evening I knew something was horribly wrong. By the time I got to a hospital and got a diagnosis, deadly flesh-eating bacteria had already eaten a great chunk of my leg. Who knew it would be just the beginning?

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I spent the next six months in an intensive care unit fighting the impossible. With the help of every known piece of life-sustaining machinery I was kept alive. However, with the C-difficile, numerous bouts of pneumonia, blood poisoning, septic shock and another long list of medical hazards, the verdict was in. The doctors didn’t think I would make it.

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For some unknown reason and to the great surprise of the medical personnel, I survived it all. However, I couldn’t go back to a normal life. For the next three years I had to have dialysis to keep me alive.

After each session of dialysis my body grew weaker and weaker. Almost weekly visits to Emergency due to numerous complications drew on my stocks of physical and emotional energy.

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The only way out was a kidney transplant. Given the average waiting time for a kidney transplant and my deteriorating health I knew that the prospect of receiving a kidney in time was nil. The only option was to find a living donor. I was incredibly lucky, as most of my family members immediately volunteered to help. Unfortunately, my unique blood mix quickly reduced the number of candidates to zero.

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To my amazement a few people I barely knew tested their blood to see if they could help but without much success. That’s when I gave up but my wife, Kasia, did not. She kept fighting and spreading the news about my situation.

And then, after months of stress and despair, we met Madeleine. I remember our first meeting. After years of suffering, disappointment and setbacks I had little hope, but the first time I saw this Frenchwoman I felt there was something different about her. Her strong and peaceful persona spread a calming tonic in the air – a feeling I hadn’t experienced for a long time.

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After months of medical tests, I was born again on November 28th, 2006. Madeleine had saved my life and become my other sister.

This year we will be celebrating the tenth anniversary of our transplant. During these ten years I could travel, take photographs and share my writing with you. Without Madeleine and her gift there would be no olafphotoblog.

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In these years, I have spent a lot of time thinking and debating why a Frenchwoman found so much courage to save one man’s life. Where did her strength come from? What triggered this decision? Why was I so fortunate?

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Kasia and I always knew we wanted to meet Madeleine’s family to get to know her history and visit her place of birth. This year, we did just that. This photographic essay is all about Madeleine and her family. This is a story that must be told – over and over again. It is a story of real courage.

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When we told our friends that we were heading to Winnipeg, they quipped, “Why would you go there?” It’s super hot (or cold), it’s flat and there are mosquitoes everywhere. After just two days spent with Madeleine and her family, Kasia and I fell in love with this super hot, flat and mosquito-ridden land. Why? Because you cannot separate the land from its people. And what people they are!

Upon our arrival, Madeleine and Raymond (Madeleine’s husband) had an entire apartment ready for us. Here is what we found on the table.

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The next day we headed to St.Pierre Jolys where Madeleine was born and where she went to school.. Her school was run by nuns but is now a local museum and that was the first stop.

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Madeleine showed us a statue on which her father, Rene Mulaire, had worked for years. She gently put her hand on the figure. We all could feel the warm and calming presence of this great man.

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Madeleine and her mother Cecile leafed through some documents and old books. The page with an image of Rene and his employees in front of his pharmacy caught our attention.

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Another room in the museum was dedicated to a character created by Madeleine’s mother, named Bicolo. Cecile ran a page in a francophone newspaper dedicated to children all about the character Bicolo. Here is Cecile and the character she created.

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…to be continued.

 

All images taken with the Fujifilm X-Pro2, the XF 35mm F1.4 and  XF 50-140mm F2.8.

 

 

2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.

The Most Important Trip Ever – Prelude

The Most Important Trip Ever – Prelude

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Over the years we have done many road trips around North America. Some of these trips brought us amazing memories and great imagery, which we often shared on this platform.

While we enjoyed them, our latest road trip was the most important we have ever taken. Not only did we capture great imagery, visit spectacular locations and enjoy great weather but we got to know special people. In particular, it was a trip that let us discover the family history of a very special person, without whom I wouldn’t be here today.

We took many images, which will help us to tell this story like no other. It is a personal story but also one that goes beyond one person. It came to our realization that this event means much more than we thought, so it must be told, over and over again.

Now as we go through the imagery shot over the last ten days, memories and emotions are being awakened. We will try to channel our thoughts into words and the flow of essential words should find its way into this blog. Stay tuned.

For now, let these few images be a prelude to the account of the most personal and greatest road trip ever.

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All images taken with the Fuji X100S, the Fuji X-Pro2, the XF 35mm F1.4, XF 14mm F2.8, XF 50-140mm F2.8.

  

2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.

Fifty Shades (and Colours) of Palouse

Fifty Shades (and Colours) of Palouse

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The problem is that at this time of year the hills and valleys in the Palouse put on an amazing display of greens and browns, enough to excite even the most demanding colour photographer. However, once you add the right lighting to the mix, you think you have landed on the set of the Alice in Wonderland movie.

At one point Kasia and I found ourselves on one of the hills and we couldn’t believe our eyes. Stormy skies allowed the sun to peek through, revealing an abundance of shapes and patterns, creating dream-like visuals. Already strong greens turn into fable-like greens and browns and yellows turned golden as if a child had coloured the land with an entire box of crayons.

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It didn’t come easy. On the first day, the Palouse exhibited dull light and overcast skies. Although such weather, if persistent, could turn any trip into a non-event, we knew that cloudy skies could provide us with what we want – if the sun found its way to peek through – even for a moment.

So, we waited and waited – for three days straight! No, we didn’t stay in a hotel. Instead we drove 1,600 kilometres around the Palouse to search out the right spots – mapping them and preparing material for our upcoming book. We also tried to get creative with the available light (below please find my personal favourite from the entire trip – well done Kasia!).

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Most importantly, each morning and evening we waited for this one moment of magic. On our second day we got it – for about five minutes – but it was enough. In fact, the lighting was so crazy that after looking at our images we were afraid we were just inches away from becoming “rainbows and unicorns” photographers. “So cheesy!” Kasia said.

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On our last day we got a few hours of dark clouds and sun which was exactly what we wanted. These conditions provided us with an abundance of opportunities and an amazing visual experience. Indeed, truly fifty shades of colour! Thank you, Palouse.

We travelled with the Fuji X-Pro2 paired with the XF 50-140mm and Fuji X100S. We were debating which film simulation we should use and we decided to go all in colour-wise – Fuji Velvia it is! And yes, it was refined with the recent update (click each image for a larger view). We will be sharing much more material (not only landscape!) over the next few posts. Stay tuned.

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and truly yours at work…

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2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Followers of Light

Followers of Light

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In the same way a painter uses oils or a sculptor works with clay to create their art, a photographer’s material is light. Although many of us have never played with clay or used oils to paint, we are all familiar with light. Whether it is a beautiful sunrise or sunset you have witnessed many times, the midday sun or just the ambient light from our nightlight – we encounter light all day long.

One of the most important tasks for an inspiring photographer is to observe this changing light and see how it affects the subjects you photograph. The best part is that you don’t need a camera to observe light. It’s something that can be done all day long while driving, commuting on a train or walking around your neighbourhood. While observing the light, pick a subject (it could be a tree, a person or a wall) and notice the changes. Keep in mind that the key use of light in a photograph will help you emphasize (bright areas) or de-emphasize (dark areas) parts of your photograph.

This is exactly what we had in mind when photographing interiors in Molson – the ghost town in Washington. Our seeing usually involves fascinating visuals and subjects. Only then do we try to work with the available light to capture our chosen scene the best way we can. This time we had chosen to follow light and let our seeing be guided purely by available light. It was fascinating to observe how light interacted with objects.

We spent about two hours in this location, mostly inside, moving between buildings frequently and visiting the same scenes multiple times. Why? Because each time we entered a structure the light guided us in a different direction, providing us with fascinating visuals and moods. What a treat!

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All images taken with the Fuji X-Pro2, the XF 35mm F1.4 and XF 14mm F2.8, the Classic Chrome (CC) film simulation.

 

 

2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.

 

Becoming Lawless with the X-Pro2

Becoming Lawless with the X-Pro2

Before you reach the community of Bridesville, just east of Osoyoos, you drive by one of the most iconic landscapes in British Columbia, the Lawless Ranch.  

Historic sources report that the Tedrow family from Kansas homesteaded the ranch and then sold it to William Lucien from Quebec. William eventually built a house, known today as the Lawless House, around 1902.

Kasia and I had explored this fascinating place before but we always knew we would come back and we wanted to do that as soon as possible. After many years of photographing historic buildings, abandoned farms and ghost towns we learnt that many of the places vanish with time just before our eyes.

Fortunately, upon arrival we noticed that the only damage to the house was the porch awning. We showed up at the location just before sunrise and we were pleased that there was some snow on the ground. Most places benefit greatly from white powder, as it simplifies the landscape and leaves you with only essential lines.

This was exactly the case with the Lawless Ranch. With snow covering the ground around the house, the lines of the Lawless House and adjacent elements were on full display. It was just a matter of arranging those elements in a way that would create a beautiful whole.

We worked with the X-Pro2, the XF 14mm F2.8, XF 35mm F1.4 and XF 50-140mm F2.8 lenses.           

We have much more material to share with you from some fascinating places; also extensive shooting with the X-Pro2. We will share more thoughts about this camera in our upcoming posts.

Stay tuned.

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Next time…

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2016 © Kasia & Olaf Sztaba Photography. All rights reserved.